BMotion’s Top Tips for Remixing


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Just as Viper Recordings release the amazing  BMotion remix of Moby‘s ‘A Simple Love’ we caught up with the man himself BMotion to get his top five tips for remixing, check it out!

 

1 – Don’t stray too far from the original.

This one has been said a million times but it’s easy to forget when you’re excited about getting stuck into a new tune! Especially when, as it’s a remix, the  musical ideas are all ready and in place and it’s easy to get carried away morphing and messing around with things eventually turning it into a completely different track!

 

2 – Follow the brief 

A pretty obvious one, but if you receive a brief along side the parts that says “we would like this to have a commercial sound” don’t give them an underground minimal roller. On the other hand , if you don’t get a brief , go for it!!

 

3 – Leave the vocal processing alone. 

By this one, i mean the main chorus / hook sections. A vocalist won’t be happy if you hand something back having changed the melody or used auto tune everywhere on something they spent months working on. This also applies to the mix down of the vocal part, make your track fit around the vocal and not the other way around, after all, the vocal is the main listening point.

 

A cool thing to do however, is take little chops / snippets of words, mess with them and have them repeating in the background as ambience or weird effects every so often. I use a plug-ins called Glitch 2 and Fracture for this quite a lot

 

4 – Make sure time stretching doesn’t affect the audio quality.

Similar to point 3 , you don’t want to ruin the vocal. A good tip for doing this is break things into small chunks, that way computers seem to deal with stretching and squashing things a bit better. This took a bit of time with the Moby remix, as they didn’t send any details on the original Bpm and there was a fair bit of vocal to go through!

 

5 – Try and retain your sound. 

 

This is probably the hardest one whether it be a remix or an original track. Trying to put your stamp on something that’s plastered with someone else’s parts is hard! I normally go through a tonne of ideas before settling on the final version. Calyx and Teebee are really good examples of this across the board, they’ve developed quite a unique sound. But as mentioned in point 1 , this may not always be what’s wanted, so striking that balance is key!!


 

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